Animalia · Performativity · Science

Small animals see in slow motion, study finds

Time doesn’t fly if you’re a fly, a new study suggests. In fact, flies excel at dodging our slaps and swats because they perceive the passage of time more slowly than we do. Animals with smaller bodies and faster metabolic rates perceive time more slowly than we do, researchers say, letting them soak up more information per second.

We tend to assume time is the same for everyone, but according to research published in the journal Animal Behaviour, it has different speeds for different species. Small-bodied animals with fast metabolic rates — whether they’re house flies or hummingbirds — perceive more information in a unit of time, the study finds, meaning they experience action more slowly than large-bodied animals with slower metabolism, including humans.

If this reminds you of a certain 1999 science-fiction movie, you’re on the right track. The study was led by scientists from Ireland’s Trinity College Dublin, which issued a press release that explains the findings with a dusty pop-culture reference: “For example, flies owe their skill at avoiding rolled-up newspapers to their ability to observe motion on finer timescales than our own eyes can achieve, allowing them to avoid the newspaper in a similar fashion to the ‘bullet time’ sequence in the popular film ‘The Matrix.”

Excerpt from an article written RUSSELL MCLENDON at MNN. Continue THERE

Bio · Science · Technology · Vital-Edible-Health

The Telescopic Eye: New surgery turns Colorado woman’s damaged eye into a telescope

Dr. Starck Johnson cuts a small hole in the right eye of Doris Ekblad-Olson, 82, in preparation for Tuesday’s operation. Ekblad-Olson suffers from “wet” macular degeneration, where blood vessels are leaking and destroying central vision.

The pea-size telescopic device, called CentraSight, is placed behind the iris.

Dr. Starck Johnson, above, looks through a telescope as he stitches the cornea of Doris Ekblad-Olson’s right eye, visible on the overhead monitor. He implanted a pea-size telescope into her eye Tuesday at Sky Ridge Medical Center in Lone Tree.

Dr. Starck Johnson holds the miniature telescope before implanting it into the eye of 82-year-old Doris Ekblad-Olson.

Text and Image via The Denver Post

Digital Media · Motion Graphics · Technology · Videos

Female Orgasm in Brodmann Brain Regions

The human brain can be separated into regions based on structure and function – vision, audition, body sensation, etc, known as Brodmann’s area map.

This animation shows the functional magnetic resonance imaging, fMRI, brain data of a participant experiencing an orgasm and the corresponding relationships seen within these different regions based on utilization of oxygen levels in the blood. 20 snapshots in time of the fMRI data are taken from a 7 minute sequence. Over the course of the 7 minutes the participant approaches orgasm, reaches orgasm and then enters a quiet period.

Oxygen utilization levels are displayed on a spectrum from dark red (lowest activity) to yellow/white (highest). As can be observed, an orgasm leads to almost the entire brain illuminating yellow, indicating that most brain systems become active at orgasm.

Text and Image by The Visual MD

Via The Guardian