Human-ities · Performativity

How to be alone together 

The search is on for a couple to train as astronauts, for a privately funded mission to Mars. But wouldn’t any couple squabble if cooped up together for 18 months? Explorer Deborah Shapiro, who spent more than a year with her husband in the Antarctic, provides some marital survival tips.

It never ceases to amaze us, but the most common question Rolf and I got after our winter-over, when we spent 15 months on the Antarctic Peninsula, nine of which were in total solitude, was: Why didn’t you two kill each other?

We found the question odd and even comical at first, because the thought of killing each other had never crossed our minds.

We’d answer glibly that because we relied on each other for survival, murder would be counter-productive.

Excerpt from an article on BBC. Continue HERE

Architectonic · Design · Photographics

Snow Glass House

The house is entirely constructed of a blue hued glass. Not only the house but other things in the house like frame of the bed is also made of the same glass. The glass sheets serve as the structural elements thus excluding the need of profiles or other supporting elements like steel or wood. Designed by Milan-based design firm, Santambrogio.

Text via Creative Greed
Images via Santambrogio

Fashion · Film/Video/New Media · Performativity

Snowboarding in an LED suit

A Night-time Snowboarding Short Lights Up the Last of the Winter Snow

Fashion photographer and filmmaker Jacob Sutton swaps the studio for the slopes of Tignes in the Rhône-Alpes region of south-eastern France, with a luminous after hours short starring Artec pro snowboarder William Hughes. The electrifying film sees Hughes light up the snow-covered French hills in a bespoke L.E.D.-enveloped suit courtesy of designer and electronics whizz John Spatcher. “I was really drawn to the idea of a lone character made of light surfing through darkness,” says Sutton of his costume choice. “I’ve always been excited by unusual ways of lighting things, so it seemed like an exciting idea to make the subject of the film the only light source.” Sutton, who has created work for the likes of Hermès, Burberry and The New York Times, spent three nights on a skidoo with his trusty Red Epic camera at temperatures of -25C to snap Hughes carving effortlessly through the deep snow, even enlisting his own father to help maintain the temperamental suit throughout the demanding shoot. “Filming in the suit was the most surreal thing I’ve done in 20 years of snowboarding,” says Hughes of the charged salopettes. “Luckily there was plenty of vin rouge to keep me warm, and Jacob’s enthusiasm kept everyone going through the cold nights.”

Via NOWNESS