Eco/Adaptable · Human-ities · Vital-Edible-Health

That Daily Shower Can Be a Killer

“Life expectancy for a healthy American man of my age is about 90. (That’s not to be confused with American male life expectancy at birth, only about 78.) If I’m to achieve my statistical quota of 15 more years of life, that means about 15 times 365, or 5,475, more showers. But if I were so careless that my risk of slipping in the shower each time were as high as 1 in 1,000, I’d die or become crippled about five times before reaching my life expectancy. I have to reduce my risk of shower accidents to much, much less than 1 in 5,475.

This calculation illustrates the biggest single lesson that I’ve learned from 50 years of field work on the island of New Guinea: the importance of being attentive to hazards that carry a low risk each time but are encountered frequently.

I first became aware of the New Guineans’ attitude toward risk on a trip into a forest when I proposed pitching our tents under a tall and beautiful tree. To my surprise, my New Guinea friends absolutely refused. They explained that the tree was dead and might fall on us.”

Excerpt from an essay by Jared Diamond at NYT. Continue HERE

Human-ities · Science · Social/Politics

The Trouble with Profiling

Why do otherwise rational people think it’s a good idea to profile people at airports? Recently, neuroscientist and best-selling author Sam Harris related a story of an elderly couple being given the twice-over by the TSA (Transportation Security Administration), pointed out how these two were obviously not a threat, and recommended that the TSA focus on the actual threat: “Muslims, or anyone who looks like he or she could conceivably be Muslim.”

This is a bad idea. It doesn’t make us any safer—and it actually puts us all at risk.

The right way to look at security is in terms of cost-benefit trade-offs. If adding profiling to airport checkpoints allowed us to detect more threats at a lower cost, then we should implement it. If it didn’t, we’d be foolish to do so. Sometimes profiling works. Consider a sheep in a meadow, happily munching on grass. When he spies a wolf, he’s going to judge that individual wolf based on a bunch of assumptions related to the past behavior of its species. In short, that sheep is going to profile…and then run away. This makes perfect sense, and is why evolution produced sheep—and other animals—that react this way. But this sort of profiling doesn’t work with humans at airports, for several reasons.

Excerpt of an article written by Bruce Schneier at Sam Harris’ blog. Continue HERE

Architectonic · Blog-Sites · Film/Video/New Media · Performativity · Public Space

Crack The Surface: Going where you “should not”

Crack The Surface takes a look at a small collection of explorers who risk it all to access and infiltrate closed or forgotten spaces, and focuses on their participation and experiences within their local and global exploring community.

Produced In Association With :

silentuk.com
sub-urban.com
placehacking.co.uk
allcitynewyork.com
shaneperez.com

Filmed Using :

Canon DSLR : 550D / 7D / 5D
Canon 24mm F1.4, Sigma 30mm F1.4
GoPro Hero HD