Book-Text-Read-Zines · Philosophy · Theory

A Carefully Crafted F**k You: Nathan Schneider interviews Judith Butler

Judith Butler’s philosophy is an assault on common sense, on the atrophy of thinking. It untangles not only how ideas compel us to action, but how unexamined action leaves us with unexamined ideas—and, then, disastrous politics. Her work over the last few years has been devoted to challenging the Bush/Cheney-era torpor that came over would-be dissenters in the face of two wars and an acquiescent electorate. She does so not with policy prescriptions or electoral tactics, but with an analysis of the habits of thinking and doing that stand behind them. It is in response to the suffering of others, she insists, of innocent victims in particular, that we must come to terms with the world as it is and act in it.

Butler is, at University of California at Berkeley, Maxine Elliot Professor in the Departments of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature. Her reputation is secure as the most important theorist of gender in the last quarter century, thanks to books like Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of Sex (1993). The thrust of her contribution is to destabilize—to queer—identity by disentangling the fragile performances that give rise to it. Whether in gender politics or geopolitics, her analysis shows how failing to grasp these sources of identity blinds us to the common humanity of others.

Excerpt from Nathan Schneider’s interview via Guernica. Continue HERE

Architectonic · Bio · Human-ities · Social/Politics · Theory

Architecture as a Practice of Biopolitical Disobedience

The large-scale transformation affecting the production of life in capitalism is also transforming the topography of oppression and the conditions in which fight and resistance are possible. A process of deconstructing technologies of gender and sexual production and normalization, which contemporary feminist thinker Judith Butler has called “undoing gender,” is already taking place.

The feminist, homosexual, and transsexual movements of the 1960s and ’70s could be understood as a collective revolt against the biopolitical disciplinary techniques of production of sexual difference and sexuality that were developed in the 19th century, together with industrial capitalism and colonialism. Likewise, contemporary gender-queer, transgender, and crip micropolitical movements could be read as examples of a larger critique of the pharmacopornographic techniques of production of the body and subjectivity, and their strategic alliance with the disciplinary regime.

Text by Beatriz Preciado. Continue via Anyone Corporation. Continue HERE
Image via Fitoatlas

Art/Aesthetics · Events · Human-ities · Shows · Social/Politics · Theory

Museum as Hub: We Who Feel Differently :: Sexual and gender “difference” after four decades of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Intersex, Queer, and Questioning politics.

“Museum as Hub: Carlos Motta: We Who Feel Differently” is a multipart project that explores the idea of sexual and gender “difference” after four decades of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Intersex, Queer, and Questioning politics. Through an exhibition, series of events, and an opening symposium, the project seeks to invigorate discussion around a queer “We” that looks beyond tolerance or assimilation toward a concept of equality that provides for greater personal freedom. The project draws from Motta’s evolving database documentary wewhofeeldifferently.info, which proposes “difference” as a profound mode of possibility for both solidarity and self-determination.

The exhibition features a video installation based on fifty interviews with an international and intergenerational group of LGBTIQQ academics, activists, artists, politicians, researchers, and radicals. Motta—together with editor Cristina Motta—identified five thematic threads from this research that address subjects ranging from activism to intimacy, art to immigration. Drawing upon early queer symbols and imagery, a series of new sculptures and prints situates narratives of the LGBTIQQ movement in dialogue with developments in art and history, while also considering their critical significance in contemporary queer discourse and culture at large. The design of the Museum as Hub by Carlos Motta and architect Daniel Greenfield—anchored by the installation of multicolored carpeting—gives the gallery an aesthetic and functional makeover that invites extended viewing and collective activity.

Text via the NEW MUSEUM
More info about “Museum as Hub: We Who Feel Differently” HERE

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The Antipode Foundation

The Antipode Foundation, Antipode’s new companion website/blog. Rather than a repository for so many addenda, or somewhere to send material which can’t ‘cut it’ in the pages of the journal, we want this to be something with a point, something of significance, working to create and support a radical geography community. Rather than a cynical exercise in advertising, or some modish initiative launched unthinkingly, we want this to be something with as much purpose and direction, substance and quality, and vitality and energy as its parent journal. With all this firmly in mind, we’ll be extending some already existing projects as well as launching some new ones.

Since August 1969 Antipode has published peer-reviewed papers which offer a radical (Marxist/socialist/anarchist/anti-racist/feminist/queer/green) analysis of geographical issues and whose intent is to engender the development of a new and better society. Now appearing five times a year and published by Wiley-Blackwell, Antipode continues to publish some of the best and most provocative radical geographical work available today; work from both geographers and their fellow travellers; from scholars both eminent and emerging.

Antipode Lecture Series

Antipode sponsors two keynote lectures each year; one at the Association of American Geographers (AAG) annual meeting and one at the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers (RGS-IBG) annual conference. We invite presenters who represent both the political commitment and intellectual integrity that characterize a radical journal of geography.

Beyond the Neoliberal Zombieland. Jamie Peck, University of British Columbia, Canada. Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), August 2011

Images and Text via Antipode