Architectonic · Book-Text-Read-Zines · Human-ities

Places of healing [The Library: A World History]

Mafra Palace Library in Mafra, Portugal

Tripitaka Koreana at the Haeinsa Temple in South Korea

Biblioteca Malatestiana in Cesena, Italy

Codrington Library at All Souls College in Oxford

Abbey of St Gall Library in St Gallen, Switzerland

George Peabody Library, Baltimore

“Will this study serve merely as a memorial to a defunct building type?” James W. P. Campbell poses this troubling question at the start of his odyssey through the library buildings of the world. Over 300 pages – and nearly 300 illustrations – later he answers his own query with cautious optimism: “humankind has created an extraordinary variety of spaces in which to read, to think, to dream and to celebrate knowledge. As long as it continues to value these activities, it will continue to build places to house them. Whether they will involve books or will still be called libraries only time will tell”.

Well, this is Thames and Hudson’s third attempt in a decade to get to grips with this theme. And it is by far the best. The first, The Most Beautiful Libraries of the World by Jacques Bosser and Guillaume de Laubier (2003), was little more than a picturebook with anecdotal captions. The coverage was primarily European and post-Renaissance: only Boston, Washington, New York and St Petersburg slipped inside the cultural fence. The second attempt – Libraries (2005) – was sadly defective: a random package of images by Candida Hofer, without text apart from a rambling preface by Umberto Eco. On every count – scholarship, production, readability – The Library: A world history is way ahead of its predecessors, particularly with regards to production and design. The photographs by Will Pryce are technically flawless, and they give point and purpose to a text which is not only informative but persuasive. The message is clear: of the making of libraries there can be no end.

The Library: A World History Hardcover
by James W. P. Campbell (Author), Will Pryce (Photographer)

Excerpt from an article written by J. MORDAUNT CROOK at TLS. Continue THERE

Architectonic · Digital Media · Earthly/Geo/Astro · Events · Human-ities

Dimensions: How big really? How many really?

Dimensions takes important places, events and things, and overlays them onto a map of where you are. Type in your postcode or a place name to get started.

Book-Text-Read-Zines · Design · Vital-Edible-Health

Delicate: New Food Culture…You are HOW you eat

About This Book

You are HOW you eat, as much as what you eat. Now, more than ever, eating is an expression of our mindset, identity, spirit, culture, and aspirations. Against this background, this book is an entertaining visual exploration of a diverse scene of young entrepreneurs that see eating as a creative challenge. They are united by a passion for making food an experience and are striving to deal with eating and nourishment in more imaginative, more sensuous, and more responsible ways.
Delicate is an inspiring collection of people, places, projects, and products from around the world that are blazing trails for a new passion for food and the ways we share it.

Eating is so much more than merely fulfilling a fundamental bodily need. Eating appeals to all of our senses; it boosts our well-being on every level. Now, more than ever, it is an expression of our mindset, identity, spirit, and culture.

Around the world, a scene of young food entrepreneurs is developing that brings together creatives, tradespeople, and activists. This scene aspires to deal with both the food that we need, and the food that we enjoy, in more creative, more sensuous, and more responsible ways. It is united by a passion for making food an experience as well as by a high appreciation for the quality, origin, aesthetics, and workmanship of food.

Delicate introduces the protagonists at the forefront of this current movement along with the projects, places, and products associated with them. The book documents a wide spectrum from small brewers, coffee roasters, and chocolate-makers to artists, event managers, and creators of zines.

Event concepts are shown that use food to facilitate communication and social interaction in tried and true, as well as surprising new ways. Locations such as shops, markets, and restaurants become meeting places for everyone who would like to learn, participate, sample, and enjoy.

The experimental projects featured in Delicate are blazing trails for a better understanding of nourishment and a new passion for food.

Text and Images via Gestalten