Bio · Digital Media · Technology

The Secret History of Life-Hacking

We live in the age of life-hacking. The concept, which denotes a kind of upbeat, engineer-like approach to maximizing one’s personal productivity, first entered the mainstream lexicon in the mid-2000s, via tech journalists, the blogosphere, and trendspotting articles with headlines like “Meet the Life Hackers.” Since then the term has become ubiquitous in popular culture—just part of the atmosphere, humming with buzzwords, of the Internet age.

Variations on a blog post called “50 Life Hacks to Simplify Your World” have become endlessly, recursively viral, turning up on Facebook feeds again and again like ghost ships. Lifehacker.com, one of the many horses in Gawker Media’s stable of workplace procrastination sites, furnishes office workers with an endless array of ideas on how to live fitter, happier, and more productively: Track your sleep habits with motion-sensing apps and calculate your perfect personal bed-time; learn how to “supercharge your Gmail filters”; oh, and read novels, because it turns out that “reduces anxiety.” The tribune of life hackers, the author and sometime tech investor Timothy Ferriss, drums up recipes for a life of ease with an indefatigable frenzy, and enumerates the advantages in bestselling books and a reality TV show; outsource your bill payments to a man in India, he advises, and you can enjoy 15 more minutes of “orgasmic meditation.”

Read Full Article at PSMAG

Performativity · Social/Politics · Sonic/Musical

President Obama releases an “Official Campaign Playlist”

Even President Barack Obama makes mix-tapes? We are not so sure about the veracity of this post. However, we like the idea. Your Music Today writes: Correct me if I’m wrong, but I don’t think I’ve ever seen or heard of a presidential campaign having an official playlist. Sure they’ve used particular songs to represent their values throughout a campaign, but a full playlist is out of the ordinary. But that’s exactly what Obama created, and tweeted, this morning. His own campaign launched an official 28-song playlist that includes tracks from Arcade Fire to Bruce Springsteen. You can go have a listen over on Spotify.

We already knew that Obama is a bit of a music connoisseur, who even enjoys his share of hip-hop (although no tracks made the final cut). And the 28 tracks, whether he picked them of not, actually make up a pretty respectable playlist! My only question is: wouldn’t this technically violate the SOPA bill if it were passed?!

Full track list below:

01 No Doubt – “Different People”
02 Earth Wind & Fire Experience feat. Al McKay Allstars – “Got To Get You Into My Life – (Live)”
03 Booker T. & The MG’s – “Green Onions – Single/LP Version”
04 Wilco – “I Got You”
05 The Impressions – “Keep On Pushing – Single Version”
06 Jennifer Hudson – “Love You I Do”
07 AgesandAges – “No Nostalgia”
08 Ledisi – “Raise Up”
09 Sugarland – “Stand Up”
10 Darius Rucker – “This”
11 Arcade Fire – “We Used to Wait”
12 Florence And The Machine – “You’ve Got The Love”
13 James Taylor – “Your Smiling Face”
14 REO Speedwagon – “Roll With The Changes”
15 Raphael Saadiq – “Keep Marchin’”
16 Noah And The Whale – “Tonight’s The Kind Of Night”
17 Zac Brown Band – “Keep Me In Mind”
18 Aretha Franklin – “The Weight”
19 U2 – “Even Better Than The Real Thing”
20 Dierks Bentley – “Home”
21 Sugarland – “Everyday America”
22 Darius Rucker – “Learn To Live”
23 Al Green – “Let’s Stay Together”
24 Electric Light Orchestra – “Mr. Blue Sky”
25 Montgomery Gentry – “My Town”
26 Ricky Martin – “The Best Thing About Me Is You Feat. Joss Stone”
27 Ray LaMontagne – “You Are The Best Thing”
28 Bruce Springsteen – “We Take Care Of Our Own”

Via Your Music Today

Design · Paint/Illust./Mix-Media · Technology

Envisioning/Speculating about emerging technologies

Understanding where technology is heading is more than guesswork. Looking at emerging trends and research, one can predict and draw conclusions about how the technological sphere is developing, and which technologies should become mainstream in the coming years.
Envisioning technology is meant to facilitate these observations by taking a step back and seeing the wider context. By speculating about what lies beyond the horizon we can make better decisions of what to create today.

Envisioning technology
is a work in progress by London-based technologist/designer Michell Zappa.