Animalia · Bio · Science · Technology

New Technique Holds Promise for Hair Growth

Scientists have found a new way to grow hair, one that they say may lead to better treatments for baldness. So far, the technique has been tested only in mice, but it has managed to grow hairs on human skin grafted onto the animals. If the research pans out, the scientists say, it could produce a treatment for hair loss that would be more effective and useful to more people than current remedies like drugs or hair transplants.

Present methods are not much help to women, but a treatment based on the new technique could be, the researchers reported Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Currently, transplants move hair follicles from the back of the head to the front, relocating hair but not increasing the amount. The procedure can take eight hours, and leave a large scar on the back of the head. The new technique would remove a smaller patch of cells involved in hair formation from the scalp, culture them in the laboratory to increase their numbers, and then inject them back into the person’s head to fill in bald or thinning spots. Instead of just shifting hair from one spot to another, the new approach would actually add hair.

The senior author of the study is Angela Christiano, a hair geneticist and dermatology professor at Columbia University Medical Center in New York, who has become known for her creative approach to research. Dr. Christiano’s interest in the science of hair was inspired in part by her own experience early in her career with a type of hair loss called alopecia areata. She has a luxuriant amount of hair in the front of her head, but periodically develops bald spots in the back. The condition runs in her family.

Excerpt from an article written by Denise Grady at NYT. Continue THERE

A picture taken on April 13, 2012 and released by the Tsuji Lab Research Institute for Science and Technology of the Tokyo University of Science shows a hairless mouse with black hair on its back at the laboratory in Noda, Chiba Prefecture.

Regenerative medicine repairs mice from top to toe. Three separate studies in mice show normal function can be restored to hair, eye and heart cells.

Animalia · Bio · Science

HAIR reGENERATION

So far all the images I have seen about this nude mice are displaying a languid mohawk hairstyle I am not too fond of. In order for me to feel the relieve that there is an actual cure for hair-loss I have to see the nude mice becoming a fur-ball rolling and rotating rather than walking. Obviously, this cruel statement comes with the question: Why not trying on us “humans” already?

Could we (all of us loosing hair) be the New Transplanting Bioengineered Stem Cells Hair Generation?

This video above accompanies a press release, distributed by ResearchSEA, on behalf of Tokyo University of Science entitled: “Fully functional hair follicle regeneration through the rearrangement of stem cells and their niches”.

Previously HERE as Regenerative medicine repairs mice from top to toe.

Animalia · Bio · Science · Technology · Vital-Edible-Health

Regenerative medicine repairs mice from top to toe. Three separate studies in mice show normal function can be restored to hair, eye and heart cells.

Transplanting bioengineered stem cells into nude mice enabled them to grow hair.Takashi Tsuji/Tokyo University of Science.

At the turn of the twentieth century, the promise of regenerating damaged tissue was so far-fetched that Thomas Hunt Morgan, despairing that his work on earthworms could ever be applied to humans, abandoned the field to study heredity instead. Though he won the Nobel Prize in 1933 for his work on the role of chromosomes in inheritance, if he lived today, the advances in regenerative medicine may have tempted him to reconsider.

Three studies published this week show that introducing new cells into mice can replace diseased cells — whether hair, eye or heart — and help to restore the normal function of those cells. These proof-of-principle studies now have researchers setting their sights on clinical trials to see if the procedures could work in humans.

Excerpt from an article written by Leila Haghighat, Nature. Continue HERE


Hair Regeneration from Adult Stem Cells