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Museum as Hub: We Who Feel Differently :: Sexual and gender “difference” after four decades of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Intersex, Queer, and Questioning politics.

“Museum as Hub: Carlos Motta: We Who Feel Differently” is a multipart project that explores the idea of sexual and gender “difference” after four decades of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Intersex, Queer, and Questioning politics. Through an exhibition, series of events, and an opening symposium, the project seeks to invigorate discussion around a queer “We” that looks beyond tolerance or assimilation toward a concept of equality that provides for greater personal freedom. The project draws from Motta’s evolving database documentary wewhofeeldifferently.info, which proposes “difference” as a profound mode of possibility for both solidarity and self-determination.

The exhibition features a video installation based on fifty interviews with an international and intergenerational group of LGBTIQQ academics, activists, artists, politicians, researchers, and radicals. Motta—together with editor Cristina Motta—identified five thematic threads from this research that address subjects ranging from activism to intimacy, art to immigration. Drawing upon early queer symbols and imagery, a series of new sculptures and prints situates narratives of the LGBTIQQ movement in dialogue with developments in art and history, while also considering their critical significance in contemporary queer discourse and culture at large. The design of the Museum as Hub by Carlos Motta and architect Daniel Greenfield—anchored by the installation of multicolored carpeting—gives the gallery an aesthetic and functional makeover that invites extended viewing and collective activity.

Text via the NEW MUSEUM
More info about “Museum as Hub: We Who Feel Differently” HERE

Human-ities · Public Space · Social/Politics

Banner Days: The Triumphant Gay Revolution



His dashing ascot billowing, his flat cap perched just so (to hide his bald spot), the cleft-chinned Harry Hay had some impressive head shots. As a student at Stanford in the early 1930s, he had come out to his classmates as “temperamental,” code for “homosexual.” In 1934, having dropped out of Stanford and moved to Los Angeles to try a career in pictures — and having already begun to hone his identity as sensualist and agitator — he joined the Communist Party. Around 1936, he turned up at a Halloween party dressed as “the demise of fascism.” The other homosexual bons vivants were stumped: none were terribly turned on to politics, so none knew what Harry’s costume meant. These men, and others like them across America, had no core ideology, no political groups to join, no leaders. Hay changed that. In 1950, he helped create the Mattachine Society, the country’s first gay rights organization, and demanded that the people it represented “be respected for our differences, not for our sameness to heterosexuals.”

Excerpt of an article written by RICH BENJAMIN, at NYT. Continue HERE