Design · Earthly/Geo/Astro · Performativity · Projects · Technology · Videos

Copenhagen Suborbitals: DIY Space Exploration

Copenhagen Suborbitals is a suborbital space endeavor, based entirely on private donators, sponsors and part time specialists

According to them: “Our mission is to launch human beings into space on privately build rockets and spacecrafts. The project is both open source and non-profit in order to inspire as many people as possible, and to involve relevant partners and their expertise. We aim to show the world that human space flight can be different from the usual expensive and government controlled project. We are working full time to develop a series of suborbital space vehicles – designed to pave the way for manned space flight on a micro size spacecraft. The mission has a 100% peaceful purpose and is not in any way involved in carrying explosive, nuclear, biological and chemical payloads. We intend to share all our technical information as much as possible, within the laws of EU-export control.

They work in a 300 sqm storage building, called Horizontal Assembly Building (HAB), placed on an abandoned but yet historic shipyard in Copenhagen, Denmark.

The areas around HAB provides them with enough space to test their own rocket engines, and being situated close to the harbour of Copenhagen makes it easy for them to go into sea for our sea launch operation.

They have no administration or technical boards to approve our work, so they move very fast from idea to construction. Everything they build is tested until they believe it will do. Then they (attempt to) fly it!

Some of their main design drivers are:

– Keep as much work in-house as possible
– Choose mechanical solutions over electrical
– Use “ordinary” materials for cheaper and faster production
– Cut away (anything), instead of adding

Images and Text via Copenhagen Suborbitals

Earthly/Geo/Astro · Science · Technology

50 Years of Spectacular Astrogeology

The most that scientists knew about Mercury, Venus, or Jupiter was their size, surface temperature, and atmospheric composition. But on Dec. 14, 1962, the Mariner 2 spacecraft flew by Venus. For the first time, researchers had detailed and up-close information about another world, helping spawn new scientific fields such as astrogeology and modern planetary science. The planets in our solar system changed from distant points to fully fledged worlds, with distinctive and amazing features.

“As Carl Sagan used to say, only one generation of humankind can be the first explorers of the solar system, and we are that generation,” USGS astrogeologist Michael Carr wrote in a recent issue of the American Geophysical Union’s weekly magazine Eos, about the last 50 years of solar system exploration.

Excerpt from an article via WIRED. Continue HERE

Architectonic · Blog-Sites · Film/Video/New Media · Performativity · Public Space

Crack The Surface: Going where you “should not”

Crack The Surface takes a look at a small collection of explorers who risk it all to access and infiltrate closed or forgotten spaces, and focuses on their participation and experiences within their local and global exploring community.

Produced In Association With :

silentuk.com
sub-urban.com
placehacking.co.uk
allcitynewyork.com
shaneperez.com

Filmed Using :

Canon DSLR : 550D / 7D / 5D
Canon 24mm F1.4, Sigma 30mm F1.4
GoPro Hero HD