Paint/Illust./Mix-Media · Public Space

Sam Songalio

Loving Sam Songalio

Paint/Illust./Mix-Media · Public Space

Behold Broken Fingaz

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Israeli street artist crew, Broken Fingaz. Love them.

Performativity · Science

Gender Visual Dynamics

Picture 16

Everyone knows that men and women tend to hold different views on certain things. However, new research by scientists from the University of Bristol and published in PLoS ONE indicates that this may literally be the case.

Researchers examined where men and women looked while viewing still images from films and pieces of art. They found that while women made fewer eye movements than men, those they did make were longer and to more varied locations.

These differences were largest when viewing images of people. With photos of heterosexual couples, both men and women preferred looking at the female figure rather than the male one. However, this preference was even stronger for women.

While men were only interested in the faces of the two figures, women’s eyes were also drawn to the rest of the bodies – in particular that of the female figure.

Felix Mercer Moss, PhD student in the Department of Computer Science who led the study, said: “The study represents the most compelling evidence yet that, despite occupying the same world, the viewpoints of men and women can, at times, be very different.

“Our findings have important implications for both past and future eye movement research together with future technological applications.”

Eye movements are a tool used to collect visual information, which then colors an individual’s perception of the world. Equally, when individuals have different interpretations of the world, this in turn affects the information they seek and, consequently, the places they look.

The researchers suggest that men and women look at different things because they interpret the world differently. The pictures preferred by women were the same pictures that produced the most distinct ‘looking patterns’. Similarly, the pictures with the largest scope for a difference in interpretation – those with people – also produced the largest differences between where men and women looked.

One perceptual sex difference in particular – women’s increased sensitivity to threat – may explain a further finding. People’s eyes are drawn to the most informative regions of an image while also being repelled from areas that carry possible threat or danger, for example the sun. Faces are a paradoxical example of a region that is both highly informative and potentially threatening, particularly if eye contact is made.

While men made direct eye contact with faces in the pictures; especially when primed to look for threat, women averted their gaze downward slightly towards the nose and mouth of these faces. The researchers claim that this may be due to women being more sensitive to the negative consequences of making direct eye contact and will, therefore, shift their gaze downward, towards the center of the face.

Research: University of Bristol. All text via EurekAlert

Paint/Illust./Mix-Media · Science

Petri Paintings by Klari Reis

www.klarireis.com

Design · Digital Media · Fashion

3D Apparel CAD: CLO 3D and Marvelous Designer

South Korean 3D CAD software developed specifically for professionals designing clothing:

CLO 3D is Easy-to-Use 3D Apparel CAD, enables you to design, to view 3D samples in real-time and to communicate easily with partners. It is possible to create a virtual sample photo-realistically within 1 hour using your 2D pattern. You can send 3D clothing data in network to colleagues, and it’ll enable you to communicate effectively with your team members across the globe. You can view in real-time the impromptu changes in patterns, designs, colors, fabric design with others.

Marvelous Designer is the company’s sister product with the same interface also used for designing virtual clothing.

Intuitive Pattern Design: Support for full pattern design functions.
Easy sewing and folding: Easy-to-use sewing operations – Support for Tuck, Shirring, Pleat, Gather, Ironed line making.
Fast and Accurate Draping: The fastest draping speed – Support for a variety of physical properties – One-click pattern placement using “Arrangement Point”.
Realtime Rendering: High-quality realtime rendering.

CLO 3D
Marvelous Designer

Blog-Sites · Book-Text-Read-Zines · Human-ities · Paint/Illust./Mix-Media · Social/Politics

The crayola-fication of the world: How we gave colors names, and it messed with our brains

“Who in the rainbow can draw the line where the violet tint ends and the orange tint begins? Distinctly we see the difference of the colors, but where exactly does the one first blendingly enter into the other? So with sanity and insanity.” —Herman Melville, Billy Budd.

In Japan, people often refer to traffic lights as being blue in color. And this is a bit odd, because the traffic signal indicating ‘go’ in Japan is just as green as it is anywhere else in the world. So why is the color getting lost in translation? This visual conundrum has its roots in the history of language.

Blue and green are similar in hue. They sit next to each other in a rainbow, which means that, to our eyes, light can blend smoothly from blue to green or vice-versa, without going past any other color in between. Before the modern period, Japanese had just one word, Ao, for both blue and green. The wall that divides these colors hadn’t been erected as yet. As the language evolved, in the Heian period around the year 1000, something interesting happened. A new word popped into being – midori – and it described a sort of greenish end of blue. Midori was a shade of ao, it wasn’t really a new color in its own right.

Excerpt of a paper via Empirical Zeal. Read it HERE. Part 2 HERE