Earthly/Geo/Astro · Science · Technology

78,000 apply to leave Earth forever to live on Mars

Huge numbers of people on Earth are keen to leave the planet forever and seek a new life homesteading on Mars. About 78,000 people have applied to become Red Planet colonists with the nonprofit organization Mars One since its application process opened on April 22, officials announced Tuesday. Mars One aims to land four people on the Red Planet in 2023 as the vanguard of a permanent colony, with more astronauts arriving every two years thereafter.

“With 78,000 applications in two weeks, this is turning out to be the most desired job in history,” Mars One Chief Executive Officer and co-founder Bas Lansdorp said in a statement. “These numbers put us right on track for our goal of half a million applicants.”

Mars One estimates that landing four settlers on Mars in 2023 will cost about $6 billion. The Netherlands-based organization plans to pay most of the bills by staging a global reality-TV event, with cameras documenting all phases of the mission from astronaut selection to the colonists’ first years on the Red Planet. The application process extends until Aug. 31. Anyone at least 18 years of age can apply by submitting to the Mars One website a 1-minute video explaining his or her motivation to become a Red Planet settler.

Text by Mike Wall. Continue THERE

Earthly/Geo/Astro · Social/Politics · Technology

Building a Lunar Base with 3D printing

Setting up a lunar base could be made much simpler by using a 3D printer to build it from local materials. Industrial partners including renowned architects Foster + Partners have joined with ESA to test the feasibility of 3D printing using lunar soil.

“Terrestrial 3D printing technology has produced entire structures,” said Laurent Pambaguian, heading the project for ESA. “Our industrial team investigated if it could similarly be employed to build a lunar habitat.”

Foster + Partners devised a weight-bearing ‘catenary’ dome design with a cellular structured wall to shield against micrometeoroids and space radiation, incorporating a pressurised inflatable to shelter astronauts. A hollow closed-cell structure – reminiscent of bird bones – provides a good combination of strength and weight.

The base’s design was guided in turn by the properties of 3D-printed lunar soil, with a 1.5 tonne building block produced as a demonstration. “3D printing offers a potential means of facilitating lunar settlement with reduced logistics from Earth,” added Scott Hovland of ESA’s human spaceflight team. “The new possibilities this work opens up can then be considered by international space agencies as part of the current development of a common exploration strategy.”

Text and Images via European Space Agency. Continue HERE

Architectonic · Bio · Technology

The Hospital Microbiome Project: Bacteria Colonization Tracked by Supercomputers

The Hospital Microbiome Project will characterize the taxonomic composition of surface-, air-, water-, and human-associated microbial communities in two hospitals to monitor changes in community structure following the introduction of patients and hospital staff. The specific aim is to determine the influence of population demographics, how the demographic interfaces with a space, and the building materials used to create that space, on the community succession, and rate of colonization by potential pathogens. This will be performed in a newly constructed private US hospital in Chicago, and a US Army medical center in Germany.

Objectives

This proposed sampling design will test several hypotheses concerning the microbial interaction of multiple demographics with the hospital infrastructure and may lead to recommendations for best practice in reducing HAIs. Four hypotheses that will be tested are:

– Microbial community structure on hospital surfaces can be predicted by human demographics, physical conditions (e.g. humidity, temperature), and building materials for each location and time.
– A patient-room microbiota is influenced by the current patient and their duration of occupancy, and shows community succession with the introduction of a new occupant.
– The colonization of the surfaces and patients by potential pathogens is influenced by composition and diversity of the existing microbial community derived from previous occupants of the space.
– The rate of microbial succession is driven by demographic usage and building materials.

For more information visit Hospital Microbiome


Microbiologist Jack Gilbert swabs the floor of a hospital wing still under construction, looking for bacteria to study.

Earthly/Geo/Astro · Performativity · Technology

The “Energies and Skills” Trilogy / Tom Sachs’ Space Program: MARS



Directed by Van Neistat, 2012. Produced on the occasion of Tom Sachs’ Space Program: MARS

Artist Tom Sachs takes his SPACE PROGRAM to the next level with a four week mission to Mars that recasts the 55,000 square foot Wade Thompson Drill Hall as an immersive space odyssey with an installation of dynamic and meticulously crafted sculptures. Using his signature bricolage technique and simple materials that comprise the daily surrounds of his New York studio, Sachs engineers the component parts of the mission—exploratory vehicles, mission control, launch platforms, suiting stations, special effects, recreational amenities, and Mars landscape—exposing as much the process of their making as the complexities of the culture they reference.

SPACE PROGRAM: MARS is a demonstration of all that is necessary for survival, scientific exploration, and colonization in extraterrestrial environs: from food delivery systems and entertainment to agriculture and human waste disposal. Sachs and his studio team of thirteen will man the installation, regularly demonstrating the myriad procedures, rituals, and tasks of their mission. The team will also “lift off” to Mars several times throughout their residency at the Armory, with real-time demonstrations playing out various narratives from take-off to landing, including planetary excursions, their first walk on the surface of Mars, collecting scientific samples, and photographing the surrounding landscape.

Text via SPACE PROGRAM: MARS

Color and 10 Bullets by Tom Sachs

Art/Aesthetics · Book-Text-Read-Zines · Human-ities · Social/Politics

Art in Our Lives: Native Women Artists in Dialogue

In 2007 the School for Advanced Research (SAR) received funding from the Anne Ray Charitable Trust Foundation in order to bring together a group of Native women artists from all walks of life to confer on three topics considered to be the central dogma of their lives. These seminars were originally titled Art, Gender, and Ceremony; however, after much debate, they were renamed Art, Gender and Community due to the conflicting view of the word “ceremony” and how it may look to the public. In a series of non-fiction essays written by the women of these SAR summits Art, Gender, and Community, Art In Our Lives Native Women Artists In Dialogue was compiled to address gender, home/crossing, and art as healing/art as struggle. These pieces are ordered thematically as each woman voices her struggles and successes in the three realms discussed at the seminars.

Chapter One (essay I) “Introduction: The Art, Gender, and Community Seminars” Cynthia Chavez Lamar

Chapter Two (essay II) “Art as Healing, Art as Struggle” Gloria J. Emerson

Chapter Three (essay III) “‘This Fierce Love:’ Gender, Women, and Art Making.” Sherry Farrell Racette

Chapter Four (essay IV) “Space, Memory, Landscape: Women in native Art History.” Elysia Poon

Chapter Five (essay V) “Crossing the Boundaries of Home and Art.” Lara Evans

Chapter Six (essay VI) “The Artists of the Art, Gender, and Community Seminars.”

Text via Native Wiki

Earthly/Geo/Astro · Social/Politics

The new question: Should we terraform Mars?

Artist’s conception of a terraformed Mars. Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Paul Scott Anderson at Universe Today: As “we” continue to explore farther out into our solar system and beyond, the question of habitation or colonization inevitably comes up. Manned bases on the Moon or Mars for example, have long been a dream of many. There is a natural desire to explore as far as we can go, and also to extend humanity’s presence on a permanent or at least semi-permanent basis. In order to do this, however, it is necessary to adapt to different extreme environments. On the Moon for example, a colony must be self-sustaining and protect its inhabitants from the airless, harsh environment outside.

Mars, though, is different. While future bases could adapt to the Martian environment as well, there is also the possibility of modifying the surrounding environment instead of just co-existing with it. This is the process of terraforming – essentially trying to tinker with Mars’ atmosphere and environment to make it more Earth-like. Although still a long ways off technologically, terraforming the Red Planet is seen as a future possibility. Perhaps the bigger question is, should we? Continue HERE