Digital Media · Public Space · Social/Politics

AirChat: Free Communications for Everyone

Airchat is a free communication tool, free as in ‘free beer’ and free as in ‘Jeremy Hammond must be freed’. It doesn’t need the internet infrastructure, nor does it need a cellphone network, instead it relies on any available radio link (or any device capable of transmitting audio – we even made a prototype working with light/laser based transmissions).

This project was conceived not only from our lessons learned in the Egyptian, Libyan and Syrian revolutions, but also from the experience of OccupyWallStreet and Plaza del Sol. We have considered the availability of extremely cheap modern radio devices (like those handhelds produced in China), to start thinking about new ways in which people can free themselves from expensive, commercial, government controlled and highly surveilled infrastructure.

AirChat is not only our modest draft or proposal for such a dream, but it is a working PoC you can use today. we hope you will enjoy it and we also hope that you too will be able to feel the beauty of free communications, free communications as in ‘free beer’ and free communications as in ‘free yourself and your people forever’.

All text and images via Airchat.

Architectonic · Bio · Technology

The Hospital Microbiome Project: Bacteria Colonization Tracked by Supercomputers

The Hospital Microbiome Project will characterize the taxonomic composition of surface-, air-, water-, and human-associated microbial communities in two hospitals to monitor changes in community structure following the introduction of patients and hospital staff. The specific aim is to determine the influence of population demographics, how the demographic interfaces with a space, and the building materials used to create that space, on the community succession, and rate of colonization by potential pathogens. This will be performed in a newly constructed private US hospital in Chicago, and a US Army medical center in Germany.

Objectives

This proposed sampling design will test several hypotheses concerning the microbial interaction of multiple demographics with the hospital infrastructure and may lead to recommendations for best practice in reducing HAIs. Four hypotheses that will be tested are:

– Microbial community structure on hospital surfaces can be predicted by human demographics, physical conditions (e.g. humidity, temperature), and building materials for each location and time.
– A patient-room microbiota is influenced by the current patient and their duration of occupancy, and shows community succession with the introduction of a new occupant.
– The colonization of the surfaces and patients by potential pathogens is influenced by composition and diversity of the existing microbial community derived from previous occupants of the space.
– The rate of microbial succession is driven by demographic usage and building materials.

For more information visit Hospital Microbiome


Microbiologist Jack Gilbert swabs the floor of a hospital wing still under construction, looking for bacteria to study.

Bio · Eco/Adaptable · Vital-Edible-Health

AirGrown: Growing Produce Out of Thin Air

“Aeroponic” is a method of growing plants in a soil-less environment, essentially in the air. Unlike traditional farming where plants are grown in soil and unlike hydroponics, where the plant root systems are immersed in a nutrient rich water bath. The patent pending AirGrown is a vertical aeroponic plant growing system in which the plant roots are allowed to grow in a hollow manifold that uses a programmed misting cycle to provide nutrient rich water directly to the plant roots. The AirGrown system also controls other essential growing elements such as water temperature and pH levels.

Text via AirGrown. Learm more HERE
Image:Scott Simmons, right, co-founder of AirGrown Systems and inventor of an aeroponic tower growing system. (via)

Design · Eco/Adaptable · Performativity · Technology · Vital-Edible-Health

Breath into electricity

AIRE is a mask that converts wind energy (provided by the wearer’s breath) into electricity for the recharging of small electronic devices.

The consumerist tendencies of today’s industrialized society make the use of gadgets increasingly common, either by necessity or hobby. Though many of our gadgets offer benefits, they tend to consume a high amount of electrical energy. This may cause problems for the environment, especially if the energy used by these devices is derived from non-renewable sources.

The use of renewable energy sources is the most important step we can take for the minimization of environmental damage. Harnessing energy from human activities and transforming it into electrical energy is possible, and is a great solution to such energy issues.

AIRE offers a way to do this. It is an electronic mask capable of converting the wind energy provided by the wearer’s breath into electrical energy. Inside the unit there are small wind turbines that make the conversion and the energy is transferred through a cable to one’s small electronic device.

AIRE
can be used in any situation, indoors or outdoors. It can be used while you sleep, walk, run, or read a book, for example. Besides saving energy (and contributing to environmental preservation), it also encourages the practice of physical exercise. Its energy is available twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week.

Design by João Paulo Lammoglia. Text via RED DOT