Art/Aesthetics · Education · Events · Human-ities · Theory

Advertising and Consumer Culture: Postgraduate Symposium

“Commercial speech – advertising – makes up most of what we share as a culture…As the language of commercialism has become louder, the language of high culture has become quieter.” – James B. Twitchell, Twenty Ads that Shook the World

Throughout the modern period, advertising and consumer culture have dominated everyday life; moreover, the trappings of commercialism permeate much of supposed ‘high culture’. Commodities clutter the pages of novels from Dickens and Zola to Bret Easton Ellis; works by Joyce and DeLillo are enlivened by advertising jingles and slogans; brands and trademarks pervade the practice of artists from Picasso to Warhol and the visualisation of consumer desire is appropriated and challenged in the work of Richard Hamilton and Martha Rosler.

Whether celebrating or critiquing advertising and consumer culture, art reflects our enduring fascination with them, despite research into the psychological effects of advertising, concerns over the evils of consumerism, and the often sinister nature of market research. The recent television show Mad Men, for instance, has revivified interest and scholarly debate surrounding the power of advertising and the consumer, as well as restaging debates around sexism, truth and the heteronormative ideal. Meanwhile, sociology in the wake of Erving Goffman continues to explore advertising’s uses and abuses of gender, identity and desire. Countervailing against consumerism and advertising’s many critics, theorists such as Michel de Certeau and the critical movement Thing Theory have endeavoured to examine advertising and consumer culture from a standpoint that goes beyond the model of the ‘passive consumer’ or Marx’s account of commodity fetishism.

Topics for discussion may include but are by no means limited to:

– The ways in which advertising and consumer culture intersect with issues of class, gender, sexuality and ethnicity
– Psychological/psychoanalytic perspectives on advertising and consumer behaviour; how identity is created and reflected through participation in consumer culture; the legacy of Freud and Bernays.
– How artists have appropriated the techniques of advertising, or have been co-opted by advertising and commodity culture (Koons, Rosler, Murakami, Kusama and Hirst) -Theorists who have engaged with advertising and consumer culture (Adorno, Barthes, Baudrillard, Certeau, Fukuyama, Goffman, Klein, Marx, McLuhan).
– The use of music in advertisements.
– The formal innovations literature has adopted to create a poetics of advertising/consumer culture.
– Shopping, the rise of the department store, brand names, and their representation in culture.
– Histories of advertising agencies or ‘ad-men’.
– How the importance of advertising in art may challenge the boundaries between high and low culture and/or modernism and postmodernism.
– Anti-consumerist movements (the Situationist International, Adbusters) and strategies (détournement, culture jamming).
– The recent transformations advertising has undergone as a result of social media -The advert as spectacle or ‘event’ (celebrity endorsements, Christmas advertising, product placement, Pawel Althamer’s Real Time Movie).
– Figures who have worked in advertising, either before or during their artistic careers (Fitzgerald, Rushdie, DeLillo, Warhol, Lynch).
– Political advertising and the roles of politics in advertising.

Submissions are now open for the Advertising and Consumer Culture symposium. More info HERE

Art/Aesthetics · Events · Photographics · Shows · Vital-Edible-Health

Death: A Self-portrait

Wellcome’s winter exhibition showcases some 300 works from a unique collection devoted to the iconography of death and our complex and contradictory attitudes towards it. Assembled by Richard Harris, a former antique print dealer based in Chicago, the collection is spectacularly diverse, including art works, historical artefacts, scientific specimens and ephemera from across the world. Rare prints by Rembrandt, Dürer and Goya will be displayed alongside anatomical drawings, war art and antique metamorphic postcards; human remains will be juxtaposed with Renaissance vanitas paintings and twentieth century installations celebrating Mexico’s Day of the Dead. From a group of ancient Incan skulls, to a spectacular chandelier made of 3000 plaster-cast bones by British artist Jodie Carey, this singular collection, by turns disturbing, macabre and moving, opens a window upon our enduring desire to make peace with death.

Death: A Self-portrait
15 November 2012 – 24 February 2013

Image above: Marcos Raya, Untitled (family portrait: group), 2005

Architectonic · Art/Aesthetics · Education · Events · Performativity · Public Space

Performing Architecture

Performing Architecture is a one-day symposium – on Saturday, October 13, 2012 – bringing together significant theorists and practitioners in the fields of architecture and performance and inviting a broader engagement with the artistic and academic community. In parallel with the art world’s return to performance and a renewed search for architecture’s social and political relevance, this symposium seeks to move beyond disciplinary hegemony in the dissemination of architecture today.

Pedro Gadanho (MoMA) and RoseLee Goldberg (Performa) will explore questions of political and aesthetic representation in their respective curatorial practices. Vito Acconci (Acconci Studio) and Jill Stoner (UC Berkeley) will engage the hermeneutics of performativity in the critical and material destructuring of space. Liz Diller (Diller Scofidio + Renfro) will present works that deal with spectatorship in relation to theater, institutional and public space. Artist Mary Ellen Carroll will demonstrate the performative gesture in her work, and question architecture’s appropriation of the public. Alex Schweder will enact an architectural renovation in real time. Victoria Øye (Canadian Centre for Architecture), Brynn Hatton (Northwestern University), Carlin Wing (New York University), and Timothy Simonds (Brown University) will present recent research on the materialization of performance in contemporary architecture. With the issues addressed at Performing Architecture, we hope to offer lasting provocations to how we think of the body, space, structure, and design in the disciplines of performance and architecture – and somewhere between the two.

Text via Performing Architecture

Architectonic · Art/Aesthetics · Design · Events · Shows · Social/Politics · Theory

Postmodernism, Style and Subversion 1970–1990

The Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A) in London is the leading museum for art and design worldwide. With the unique «Postmodernism, Style and Subversion 1970–1990» exhibition, the V&A is visiting the Swiss National Museum in Zurich. Its exhibition shows a bold new interpretation of recent art and design history, postmodernism. Tribute will be paid to this era for the first time in Switzerland in a comprehensive presentation using international objects from the areas of architecture, design, music and graphics. Postmodernism substantially changed the familiar notions of our everyday world. Architects and designers rejected the strict concepts of the modern age and made room for a bright and multifaceted diversity. The Swiss National Museum in Zurich is delighted to present this successful exhibition from London. It will be complemented by key Swiss representatives.

Text and Images via http://www.postmodernism.ch/

Art/Aesthetics · Events · Social/Politics

dOCUMENTA (13) Resources

This area of the website gathers together and articulates throughout a series of subsections, the materials that constitute the various sources from which dOCUMENTA (13) gradually came into being, as well as the different accounts that are being recorded during its making.

It is in an attempt to bear witness to the process in its multifaceted, contingent and inhomogeneous nature, as well as to the individual and common trajectories of those who took, are and will be taking part in the project. The texts, images and videos that constitute the different entries of this resources area are listed chronologically here, and further organized around the subcategories “100 Days”, “Glossary”, “Minutes”, Projects”, and “Materials”.

Text via dOCUMENTA (13) Resources

Architectonic · Earthly/Geo/Astro · Events · Science

Egypt’s Sphinx, Pyramids threatened by groundwater

One month ago, Giza’s antiquities inspectorate installed a new system to pump subterranean water out from under Egypt’s historical Sphinx monument and the underlying bedrock.

Subterranean water levels at the Giza Plateau, especially the area under the valley temples and Sphinx, have recently increased due to a new drainage system installed in the neighboring village of Nazlet Al-Seman and the irrigation techniques used to cultivate the nearby residential area of Hadaeq Al-Ahram.

Via The Archeology News Network. Continue HERE

Art/Aesthetics · Book-Text-Read-Zines · Events

Expanded Artists’ Books: Envisioning the Future of the Book


The Center for Book and Paper Arts, a program of the Interdisciplinary Arts Department at Columbia College Chicago, recently received a $50,000 Arts in Media grant from the National Endowment for the Arts in support of a new electronic publishing initiative, Expanded Artists’ Books. This grant will support an award of two $10,000 commissions for new artworks for the iPad. These will have physical counterparts that intersect, modulate, or inform the digital components of the artwork.

CALL FOR COMMISSION PROPOSALS
– Two $10,000 commissions will be awarded

Art/Aesthetics · Book-Text-Read-Zines · Events · Shows

Download Manifesta 9 Newspapers

Download the Manifesta 9 newspapers as PDF to get informed before your visit to Manifesta 9, or to reflect after you’ve seen the exhibition.

Art/Aesthetics · Events

A Glimpse of Art’s Future at Documenta by Jerry Saltz



Three quarters of the art at Documenta 13, the gigantic 200-exhibitor show that just opened in the small German city of Kassel, is innocuous or worse. Derivative installations, found objects, text pieces, videos, sculptural fragments, empty rooms, performances, and sound works — it’s the kind of late-late conceptual/relational aesthetics hegemony endemic to these massive events. I won’t run down the list, but one immoral work (if such a thing can be said to exist) will suffice to give you the sense of it: In A Public Misery Message: A Temporary Monument to Global Economic Inequality, created by a group called the Critical Art Ensemble, viewers ride in a helicopter to heights corresponding to their net worth. The work is supposedly about wealth accumulation, and is an anti-market gesture. Surely it cost more to stage for a day than many museums and galleries can spend or generate in a year, or than most artists earn in a lifetime.

Excerpt of an article written by Jerry Saltz. Continue HERE
Image above: Song Dong’s Doing Nothing Garden (2010–12), at Documenta 13.

Art/Aesthetics · Events · Human-ities · Shows · Social/Politics · Theory

Museum as Hub: We Who Feel Differently :: Sexual and gender “difference” after four decades of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Intersex, Queer, and Questioning politics.

“Museum as Hub: Carlos Motta: We Who Feel Differently” is a multipart project that explores the idea of sexual and gender “difference” after four decades of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Intersex, Queer, and Questioning politics. Through an exhibition, series of events, and an opening symposium, the project seeks to invigorate discussion around a queer “We” that looks beyond tolerance or assimilation toward a concept of equality that provides for greater personal freedom. The project draws from Motta’s evolving database documentary wewhofeeldifferently.info, which proposes “difference” as a profound mode of possibility for both solidarity and self-determination.

The exhibition features a video installation based on fifty interviews with an international and intergenerational group of LGBTIQQ academics, activists, artists, politicians, researchers, and radicals. Motta—together with editor Cristina Motta—identified five thematic threads from this research that address subjects ranging from activism to intimacy, art to immigration. Drawing upon early queer symbols and imagery, a series of new sculptures and prints situates narratives of the LGBTIQQ movement in dialogue with developments in art and history, while also considering their critical significance in contemporary queer discourse and culture at large. The design of the Museum as Hub by Carlos Motta and architect Daniel Greenfield—anchored by the installation of multicolored carpeting—gives the gallery an aesthetic and functional makeover that invites extended viewing and collective activity.

Text via the NEW MUSEUM
More info about “Museum as Hub: We Who Feel Differently” HERE

Art/Aesthetics · Events · Performativity · Technology

LIVE INTERFACES: Performance, Art, Music

Live Interfaces is a conference on live, technology-mediated interaction in performance. The conference seeks to investigate cross-disciplinary understandings of performance technology with a particular focus on issues related to the notion of liveness in interaction.

Live Interfaces will consist of paper and poster presentations, performances and workshops over two days. Researchers, theorists and artists from diverse fields are encouraged to participate, including: digital performance, live art, computer music, choreography, music psychology, interaction design, human computer interaction, digital aesthetics, computer vision, smart materials and augmented stage technology.

We invite submissions addressing the conference theme of technology-mediated live interaction in performance, and suggest the following indicative topics:

– Audience perception/interaction
– Biophysical sensors
– Brain-computer interfaces
– Computer vision/real-time video in performance
– Cross-modal perception/illusion
– Digital dramaturgy/choreography/composition
– Digital performance phenomenology
– Gesture recognition and control
– Historical perspectives
– Live coding in music, video animation and/or dance
– Participatory performance
– Performance technology aesthetics
– Redefining audience interaction
– Tangible interaction

CALL FOR PAPERS AND PERFORMANCES

Events · Human-ities · Public Space · Social/Politics

Fix-It-Yourself: The Art of Creating Revolutionary Economic Models

Inventing alternative forms of exchange for a fair economy is one of the most crucial creative challenges of our time. The current global economic models and monetary policy are intimating the collapse of the system itself, prompting a new understanding of the philosophical underpinnings of economic theory. The artists on the panel present distinct solutions to alter the way society shares wealth, exchanging resources, goods, and skills through visionary means of trade. In so doing, they propose revolutionary projects for social justice, countering the logic of profit and willful exploitation of instability and inequality.

The panel addresses the deep rooted problems with the conventions and tools of international finance such as the Special Purpose Vehicles, High-Frequency Trading, and even the Bretton Woods system, which has influenced the daily reality of the global population. The artists reject such nonsensical rules and strive to fix the system with new strategies of innovation and subversion, beyond the notions of debt, capital, and even money.

The panelists share their visions by discussing new local and digital currencies, barter schemes, fair finance instruments, and timeshare groups they have been involved in creating. An open debate with the audience follows the presentations. In this lively event, the audience gets involved in brainstorming, imagining, and finding solutions for a large-scale implementation of the models proposed by the artists.

Speakers include Paolo Cirio, Mary Jeys, Jessie Reilly, Gregory Sholette, and Caroline Woolard.

Saturday, June 16, 2012 2 PM
The Kitchen, 512 W 19th Street

Text and Image via Whitney. +++ Info Continue HERE

Architectonic · Digital Media · Earthly/Geo/Astro · Events · Human-ities

Dimensions: How big really? How many really?

Dimensions takes important places, events and things, and overlays them onto a map of where you are. Type in your postcode or a place name to get started.

Events · Performativity · Public Space · Social/Politics · Videos

Reel-Unreel By Francis Alÿs | dOCUMENTA 13

Francis Alÿs
Reel-Unreel
Kabul, Afghanistan
2011

In collaboration with Julien Devaux and Ajmal Maiwandi

Commissioned by dOCUMENTA (13)
Produced by dOCUMENTA (13) and the
artist. Special thanks to the kids of Kabul;
Goethe-Institut Afghanistan; David Zwirner.

Architectonic · Art/Aesthetics · Book-Text-Read-Zines · Events · Human-ities · Performativity · Public Space

The Unproposal: Building voluntary ruins as critical practice

The Unproposal is a hybrid talk-screening of recently completed and ongoing projects by the architect, artist and writer Andreas Angelidakis. Taking the form of video and online communities, exhibition design, installation and publications, Angelidakis’ work speculates on what architectural practice can be in the post-capitalist landscape of constant media consumption and perpetual crisis.

21st Century
Andreas Angelidakis
The Unproposal: Building voluntary ruins as critical practice
Tuesday 12 June, 7pm

Via Chisenhale Gallery

Art/Aesthetics · Events · Shows · Social/Politics

Superpower: Africa in Science Fiction

Pumzi, 2010, Wanuri Kahiu

Kempinski, 2007. Video installation. Artist : Neil Beloufa

Common Task (Mali), 2008. Photographic documentation of an action by Wieslaw Niedzwiecki. Artist : Pawel Althamer

The spaceship Icarus13, view from the Chicala Island, Luanda, 2007. Digital Chromogenic Print on matt paper.

Astronomy Observatory, Namibe Desert, 2007. Digital Chromogenic Print on matt paper.

Superpower: Africa in Science Fiction surveys the recent tendency for artists and filmmakers to apply the forms and concerns of science fiction to narratives situated in the African continent. It considers the complex undercurrents for this occurrence in art today, and posits other and possible realities existing simultaneously, via careful re-orientations of tense; elevating the need for vigilance towards the present and future over a concern for the past.

Africa has had a rare yet distinct place in popular science-fiction, from the opening scenes of Stanley Kubrick’s iconic 2001: A Space Odyssey, depicting the mysterious appearance of a black monolith in the cradle of civilization, to the recent success of Neill Blomkamp’s debut movie District 9, a multi-layered allegory on South Africa’s recent internal and external tensions. Imagining a new space-time to the typical “third worldist” representations of the African continent, caught in a perpetual state of crisis, the works in Superpower project an alternative landscape of possibilities.

Artists include:

João Maria Gusmão & Pedro Paiva
Kiluanji Kia Henda
Luis Dourado
Mark Aerial Waller
Neïl Beloufa
Neill Blomkamp
Omer Fast
Pawel Althamer
The ARPANET Dialogues
Wanuri Kahiu

Text via Arnolfini. More Info HERE. Images via This is Tomorrow


Trailer For PUMZI a Short film Produced By Inspired Minority and Writer/Director: Wanuri Kahui and Producers: Simon Hansen, Hannah Slezacek and Amira Quinlan.

Book-Text-Read-Zines · Digital Media · Education · Events

Publishing as part time Practice

Over the last few years, a wide range of new publishing initiatives have developed within the arts and design fields. New book fairs are emerging in major cities, small publishing houses and independent presses are frequently initiated and the alternative bookshop seems to recurrently be reborn in new forms. Something that seems to tie these activities together, is that they are run by practitioners themselves — photographers, artists, authors and graphic designers — often with a visionary idea of how to redefine the world of publishing.

On May 25th 2012, a few of these interesting and inspiring practitioners have been invited to Stockholm to take part in the seminar ‘Publishing as (part-time) Practice’. Confirmed participating publishers are: Elin Maria Olaussen / Karen Christine Tandberg from Torpedo Books and Press (NO), Georg Rutishauser from Edition Fink (CH), Matthew Stadler from Publication Studio (US), Anna Gerber / Britt Iversen from Visual Editions (UK), Nille Svensson from Nilleditions (SE), Jacob Grønbech Jensen / Rikard Heberling / Emi-Simone Zawall from Drucksache (SE) and more to be announced. Andrew Blauvelt from Walker Art Center (US) will introduce the event as well as provide a concluding reflection at the end of the evening.

Text via Konst & Teknik

Events · Film/Video/New Media · Performativity

IOIC – Institute of Incoherent Cinematography

The Institute of Incoherent Cinematography promotes the image of silent film and its representation in the form of live setting to music.

Activities

The Institute domiciled in Zurich organizes an annual three-day silent film marathon with live music centered on a clearly defined theme, which will be treated extensively and in depth. Furthermore, the Institute organizes smaller events and film cycles in other Swiss cities and abroad, presenting the season’s highlights to a larger audience in various regions.

The live music performances take into consideration cultural and social variety and aim to consider musicians, sound artists, bands, ensembles and orchestras of various age groups and styles of music. This is, among others, intended to actively promote the exchange between the various genres.

The participating musicians largely hail from the Zurich region and to a smaller part from the rest of Switzerland as well as occasionally from abroad.

For the 2011/2012 seasons, events are intended in Zurich, Baden and Lausanne. For the following year events are foreseen in other Swiss cities as well as in Beijing and Shanghai.

Events · Performativity · Videos

For the bilingual and Spanglish speakers: Leonard Cohen’s Principe of Asturias Awards Discurso

Leonard Cohen’s 21 Oct 2011 “How I Got My Song” speech given at the Prince Of Asturias Awards. Of course, if this hybrid drives you crazy you might opt for no overdubbing below:

Events · Festivals · Performativity

Fierce Festival 2012


Birmingham’s international festival of live art returns again! Expect a distinctive cocktail of interventions, theater, parties, gigs, installations, talks, workshops and feasting. Since spring 2011 a few changes have been made. We’ve extended the festival to two weekends including the Easter; and we won’t be running alongside our close friends Flatpack Festival who now precede us by a couple of weeks. ‘Getting involved’ is at the heart of this festival. Mehmet Sander’s IMPACT, Ron Athey’s Gifts of The Spirit and Mette Edvardsen’s Time Has Fallen Asleep in the Afternoon Sunshine involve volunteer non-professional performers collaborating with international artists to create shows. On the 31st March 2012 the Dachshund UN will take place for the first time in the UK; sausage dogs from the West Midlands and beyond will represent the delegates of each country in the United Nations General Assembly.

WE ARE FIERCE

Animalia · Art/Aesthetics · Design · Education · Events · Performativity · Videos

Designer choreographs ant ballet at the Pestival

Produced by Ollie Palmer, the Ant Ballet is a 2-year investigation into the parallels between human and ant communication which culminated in the world’s first ballet to exclusively feature ants. It is currently in Phase I of IV.

Using synthesized pheromones (Z9:16Ald Hexadecanol) and highly invasive Linepthinema humile Argentine ants, a robotic arm lays pheromone powder trails that cause the ants to behave in a different way to their usual foraging. Performances in late 2012 will feature mass colony movement testing, and the first intercontinental ant ballet.

The machine is part of a larger study of paranoia, control systems, insects and architecture.

The Ant Ballet will be installed in ZSL London Zoo’s BUGS zone with simulated ants until June 2012, and at FutureEverything festival in Manchester from the 16th – 19th May. The first live Ant Ballet performance will take place as part of Pestival in Sao Paulo later in the year.



Pestival aims to initiate a cultural shift in the way people think, moving them towards a more integrated way of looking at the natural world. Pestival’s lasting legacy is to forge new working relationships between disciplines, communities and species. Pestival says “Insectes Sans Frontières”.

Pestival believes insects are critical to human life on Earth. With over a million insect species, they are the most diverse group of animals on Earth. And yet insects are frequently misunderstood, reviled or, at best, ignored by the majority of the human population.

Pestival has set out to challenge existing stereotypes about insects and to give them their rightful place, for good and bad (vectors and pollinators), in our collective cultural consciousness.

Via WIRED

Art/Aesthetics · Digital Media · Education · Events · Film/Video/New Media · Performativity · Podcast · Videos

BMW Tate Live: Performance Room [Jerome Bell]

BMW Tate Live: Performance Room is an innovative series of performances broadcast viewable exclusively online around the globe, as they happen.

Five artists each present works for the BMW Tate Live Performance Room beginning with choreographer and dancer Jérôme Bel on 22 March 2012 and continuing monthly with Pablo Bronstein, Harrell Fletcher, Joan Jonas and Emily Roysdon. Audiences can pose questions to the artist and curators, and interact with other viewers via social media.

You are invited to enter the online BMW Tate Live Performance Room via Tate’s YouTube channel at 20.00 hrs in the UK and at exactly the same moment across the globe on the specified dates. So if you are on the East Coast of America, log on at 15.00 hrs for a mid-afternoon art break, if you are located in Europe then join us at 21.00 hrs for an evening performance and for those in Russia, needing some late night art at 23.00 hrs.

A second chance to watch Jerome Bell’s performance and see the conversation with the artist and curators captured live Thursday 22nd March 2012 at Tate Modern.

Text via TATE

See Pablo Bronstein on 26 April, Emily Roysdon on 31 May, Harrell Fletcher on 28 June and Joan Jonas later in the year.

Events · Performativity · Projects · Shows

The Abramović Method

The Abramović Method was born from the artist’s reflections on three major performances from the last decade: The House With the Ocean View (2002), Seven Easy Pieces (2005) and The Artist is Present (2010). These performances left a deep imprint on Abramović’s perception of her work in relation to the public.

“In my experience, as developed in a career of over 40 years, I have arrived at the conclusion that the public plays a very important and indeed crucial role in performance,” she explains. “The performance has no meaning without the public because, as Duchamp said, it is the public that completes the work of art. In the case of performance, I would say that public and performer are not only complementary but almost inseparable.”

The PAC in Milan is the venue chosen by Marina Abramović to host her eagerly awaited new body of work, entitled The Abramović Method. This is the first major museum exhibition premiering new works since her groundbreaking retrospective in 2010 at the MoMA, New York. The Abramović Method will be on view at the PAC from March 21 through June 10, 2012.

Text taken from
The Abramović Method

Art/Aesthetics · Blog-Sites · Events · Performativity

America’s Got No Talent

“America’s Got No Talent” is a web-based software project by Jonah Brucker-Cohen and Katherine Moriwaki that synthesizes and processes the steady stream of Twitter feeds for several American reality television shows such as “American Idol,” “America’s Got Talent,” “America’s Next Top Model,” and “X Factor US” among others in this genre. The project highlights when and how these shows gain popularity through social media and followers. When tweets are sent, they are dynamically displayed along with the bias for each program which is based on retweets from followers as well as fans. The visualization takes the form of a horizontal bar graph in the shape of an American flag that updates dynamically. Each show’s virtual presence grows in size based on the amount of attention it receives from social media users worldwide, creating a measurement meter that ranks popular media on their social exposure, rather than their credit as viable media sources.

Commissioned for the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2012 for Artport, with support provided by Jeremy Levine.

Via Whitney Museum of American Art

Art/Aesthetics · Events · Podcast · Projects · Sonic/Musical

Radio Boredcast: A 744-hour Continuous Online Radio Project


Radio Boredcast is a 744-hour continuous online radio project, curated by artist Vicki Bennett (People Like Us) with AV Festival. In response to our ambiguous relationship with time – do we have too much or not enough? – Radio Boredcast celebrates the detail, complexity and depth of experience lost through our obsession with speed.

With over 100 participants Radio Boredcast includes new and unpublished works, freeform radio shows, field recordings, interviews, monologues and much, much more. Thematic playlists will run throughout from “Acconci” to “Zzz…”
You can listen continuously for a month, or for hours, minutes or seconds. Online 24 hours each day, at www.avfestival.co.uk or www.thepixelpalace.org.

Co-commissioned by AV Festival and Pixel Palace, hosted by BASIC.fm.

Look at the program and listen to Radio Boredcast HERE

Read Collateral Damage by Vicki Bennett at The WIRE

“In the early 2000s, increased bandwidth allowed recombinant artists to enter the gift economy. It’s a freedom we should defend at all costs, argues Vicki Bennett aka People Like Us.

In 1999 I bought my first fast computer – and although it was dying to do speedy things, I was on dial-up, reduced to a crawl when it came to information retrieval. Logged into file sharing communities, I’d sit in the chat and watch people posting files that would take me a day to download, so I’d just read about them. Then I’d go to the WFMU website and try to stream the station and just get blurts and gaping silences. Then I’d visit archive.org and look at all the wonderful synopses for Rick Prelinger’s films, which were too large to access. 
It wasn’t long, however, before affordable broadband reached my area of London. Then everything 
changed. Forever.”

Art/Aesthetics · Events · Shows · Social/Politics

Where is the “No Lone Zone” exhibition? I cannot find it

No Lone Zone is a technical term that applies to a restricted area in which at least two individuals must be within visual reach overseeing a critically sensitive procedure.

No Lone Zone, at the Tate Modern’s Level 2 Gallery, is an exhibition that brings together works by Teresa Margolles, Cinthia Marcelle, David Zink Yi and the collective Tercerunquinto to explore this concept in relation to the vulnerability of current social and economic structures. Comprising sculpture, video and installation, these works reflect on the sense of loss, danger and urgency that affect the realm of human actions and collective endeavors within this global scenario.

The No Lone Zone exhibition has been curated by Iria Candela and Taiyana Pimentel in association with Gasworks. However there is no trace of the show at the Level 2 Gallery. Perhaps another tactical act.

Image above: Screenshot of the Tate’s website
Image at top: “Score Settings 16” by Teresa Margolles

Art/Aesthetics · Education · Events · Human-ities · Philosophy · Social/Politics · Technology · Theory

The Nonhuman Turn in 21st Century Studies

This conference takes up the “nonhuman turn” that has been emerging in the arts, humanities, and social sciences over the past few decades. Intensifying in the 21st century, this nonhuman turn can be traced to a variety of different intellectual and theoretical developments from the last decades of the 20th century:

actor-network theory
, particularly Bruno Latour’s career-long project to articulate technical mediation, nonhuman agency, and the politics of things

affect theory, both in its philosophical and psychological manifestations and as it has been mobilized by queer theory

animal studies, as developed in the work of Donna Haraway, projects for animal rights, and a more general critique of speciesism

the assemblage theory of Gilles Deleuze, Manuel DeLanda, Latour, and others

new brain sciences like neuroscience, cognitive science, and artificial intelligence

new media theory, especially as it has paid close attention to technical networks, material interfaces, and computational analysis

the new materialism in feminism, philosophy, and marxism

varieties of speculative realism like object-oriented philosophy, vitalism, and panpsychism

and systems theory in its social, technical, and ecological manifestations

Such varied analytical and theoretical formations obviously diverge and disagree in many of their aims, objects, and methodologies. But they are all of a piece in taking up aspects of the nonhuman as critical to the future of 21st century studies in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

Invited speakers (to date) include:

Jane Bennett (Political Science, Johns Hopkins)
Ian Bogost (Literature, Communication, Culture, Georgia Tech)
Wendy Chun (Media and Modern Culture, Brown)
Mark Hansen (Literature, Duke)
Erin Manning (Philosophy/Dance, Concordia University, Montreal)
Brian Massumi (Philosophy, University of Montreal)
Tim Morton (English, UC-Davis)
Steven Shaviro (English, Wayne State)

More Info HERE

Art/Aesthetics · Events · Performativity

Yvonne Rainer. Performance Series at Dia:Beacon

Over the course of three weekends in October, 2011, and February and May, 2012, Dia Art Foundation will present a series of Yvonne Rainer’s dance works at Dia:Beacon, Riggio Galleries. Dia’s retrospective, entitled Yvonne Rainer, will celebrate the depth of Rainer’s contributions to dance and will feature early works of choreography from the 1960s—including both iconic and lesser-known pieces—as well as three compositions created within the last twelve years.

Via Dia:Beacon

Education · Events · Theory

Para-Academic Publishing & Book Party

The term ‘para-academic’ captures the multivalent sense of something that fulfills and/or frustrates the academic from a position of intimate exteriority. Para-academia is that which is beside academia, a place whose logic encompasses many reasons and no reason at all (para-, “alongside, beyond, altered, contrary,” from Greek para-, “beside, near, from, against, contrary to,” cognate with Sanskrit para “beyond”). The para is the domain of: shadow, paradigm, daemon, parasite, supplement, amateur, elite. The para-academic embodies an unofficial excess or extension of the academic that helps, threatens, supports, mocks (par-ody), perfects and/or calls it into question simply by existing next to it. Following a series of classes organized through The Public School New York on the subject of “Para-Academia and Theory Fiction,” this event brings together a group of editors whose work in publishing falls within the para-academic, in one sense or another. Presenters will address the practice and theory of para-academic publishing, its relation to various areas of life (art, pedagogy, politics), and present some of their recent titles.

Panel Discussion on Para-Academic Publishing & Book Party

Observatory
543 Union St., Brooklyn, NY
April 17, 2012
7:00pm

More Info HERE

Via Progressive Geographies

Art/Aesthetics · Education · Events · Performativity · Science · Sonic/Musical

No sound exists on its own: The Global Composition / Call for scientific, scholarly and artistic proposals

The sonic environment is an indicator for the quality of life

One crucial aspect, however, remains open and leads to a multitude of questions: Is this, what our hearing is exposed to, satisfying and enhancing our individual, social, functional, biological, economical, aesthetic and existential needs and endeavors? If not, which concepts exist to “orchestrate” everyday life’s cacophony? Which methods exist to successfully evaluate the quality of soundscapes? Which criteria and values have to be developed, which practical constraints and habits to be dismissed in order to design the everyday as a “Hörenswürdigkeit”, which means: as something worth listening to?

How to improve the Global Composition to make the world more liveable?

Within this process: What role does media play and relation to its commodification of sound? Are there valid approaches to or even successful examples of shaping the soundscape in ways that are beneficial or at least acceptable for a majority? Are there strategies for overcoming the societal, political and economic hindrances that inhibit the inclusion of auditory considerations in the making of a sustainable society? What is the role of art in developing paradigms for auditory solutions applied to our living environments?

How to foster listening abilities within the concert of the senses?

Last but not least, what educational concepts and methods exist for integrating listening abilities into the concert of the senses, and develop auditory faculties as important tools for understanding, criticizing, shaping and designing the global environment? More infos on keynote speakers, conference fees and organisational details will be announced soon.

Proposals are invited for papers/posters, workshops, roundtable discussions, applied and artistic contributions, relating, but not limited to the conference’s main topics. (Please, load down the appropriate form from this page and fill it out.)

Call for Proposals HERE